ORMEs - PARTING THE WET METHOD PRECIPITATES TO DETERMINE M-STATE CONSTITUENTS

PARTING THE WET METHOD PRECIPITATES
TO DETERMINE M-STATE CONSTITUENTS

The parting methods given here are the end results of much work. They were developed in an unheated space with an ambient temperature of approximately 50o F.  Residence time adjustments may need to be made for other conditions.

Various methods were tried and gave similar results but these are the easiest to reproduce for someone with limited equipment and experience.

Various acids were tested, along with buffered solutions and ammonium salts.  Ultimately, I chose the least exotic for its simplicity.
The separated fractions have very distinct color shades and textures
While no metal is produced by these procedures, the final separation of M-Iridium from M-Gold by sublimation gives more weight loss than can be accounted for by water of hydration alone (assuming Mg(OH)2 ).

This supports claims made by David Hudson and the Essene.
As the separated fractions are not reduced to weighable metal, it is possible that the entire procedure is an exercise in chimerastry rather than chemistry.

However, a microwave assay system which I have devised does give weighable gold metal from this material, 300% above results obtainable by any standard assay procedure.

This again gives some support to the claims of other researchers.

These parting methods are offered in the hope that they may be useful and perhaps even help to open a door for discovery.
 
PARTING THE WET METHOD PRECIPITATES TO DETERMINE M-STATE CONSTITUENTS

I.  SEPARATION OF THE  M-STATE ELEMENTS FROM  Mg(OH)2

This method is based on several properties of Mg(OH)2.
In a slurry magnesium hydroxide has a pH of 10.5, but, the pH drops to 9.0 when the slurry is being used to neutralize a mild acid.
This parting must be done by hand, without mechanical agitation.  Otherwise it proceeds too quickly, and M-State becomes entrained with the magnesium and lost to the filtrate.
Thoroughly dried ORMUS precipitates are ground to fine powder and made into a 1.25% slurry.
While stirring by hand, a 5 to 1 or weaker solution of HCl is added, a drop at a time, to bring the pH down to 8.8.
Using a well-calibrated pH meter, notice how long it takes for the slurry to rebound to 9.1, while stirring vigorously.
This procedure is repeated until the rebound time is more than 60 seconds.
At this point, separate the solids, dry them at 275o F and regrind to fine powder.
Replace the solids in the filtrate and proceed as before.
When, once again, the rebound time between pH 8.8 and 9.1 becomes more than 60 seconds; filter, dry and grind the solids.  Then replace them in the filtrate and proceed as before.
When the rebound time between pH 8.8 and 9.1 becomes 90 seconds, or more, end point has been achieved.
It is postulated that when the slurry no longer strongly exhibits its original pH characteristics, the remaining solids must be something other than Mg(OH)2 .
Filter and dry the solids, regrind and weigh.
Subtract this weight from the weight of the original sample.  This represents the Mg(OH)2 which has gone into solution.  Multiply this times .4168 to obtain the weight as Magnesium.
Note that the color of these solids is very perceptively different from the original.
A dried hydroxide precipitate from the filtrate will also differ from the original in translucency and much less resistance to pulverization in a mortar and pestle.

II. SEPARATION OF THE M-IRIDIUM AND M-GOLD FROM THE M-RHODIUM AND OTHER M-STATE ELEMENTS.

Place the ground residue from the first parting in enough water to create a .25% slurry. While stirring, add dilute HCl, a drop at a time to lower the pH to 5.
Continue to do this until the rebound time between pH 5.4 and 6.4 is 120 seconds or more.
Again, it is postulated that when the slurry no longer strongly exhibits its original pH characteristics (in this case alkalinity) parting is complete.
Filter and dry the solids at 275 o F, then regrind and weigh.
Subtract this weight from the weight of the first parting residue.
Supposing that the lost weight represents M-Rh(OH)4 or an analogue, then the lost weight  x  .602  =  M-Rh.

III.  SEPARATION OF THE M-GOLD FROM THE M-IRIDIUM
 
Place the residue from the second parting in an oven at 500o F for 15 minutes, to ignite carbon.  Weigh the residue.
Place the residue from ignition in a retort, scorifying dish or other container capable of withstanding sustained heat at 750o C.
Place in a cold oven and raise the temperature to 750oC.  Hold the temperature for 30 minutes and then turn off the oven and allow both oven and sample to cool.
Weigh the residue and subtract from the original to find the lost weight.
Final calculations are as follows:
A.  Supposing a compound M-Ir(OH)4 or an analog, which decomposes at 350o C to form M-IrO2 + 2H2O, the weight of the residue x .8573 would equal the weight of M-Iridium
B.  Supposing a compound M-Au2(OH)6 or an analogue, that decomposes at 250o C to  M-Au2O3 + 3H2O and then sublimates between 450o and 650o C.
 1.  Take the measured weight loss and subtract from it, the hypothecated M-Ir(OH)4 water of hydration, which is calculated as follows:  retort residue x .1607 = M-Ir(OH)4 water of hydration.      
2.  Multiply the remaining weight loss x .7944 to obtain M-Gold.


 ORMUS Parting Methods, by Barry Carter

 Here is a little chart that I have prepared with information which we might use for parting the m-state elements:

Element ...................... ORME BP ........... Dry M-state dissolves in Hydrochloric
Magnesium ......................................................................... Y
Calcium ............................................................................... Y
Cobalt ................................................................................. Y
Nickel ................................................................................. Y
Copper ................................................................................ Y
Ruthenium ............................................................................ Y
Rhodium .................. 1066 C - 1250 C ...............................Y
Palladium .................. Over 2700 C ..................................... Y
Silver ........................... 1800 C ......................................... Y
Rhenium .............................................................................. Y
Osmium ............................................................................... Y
Iridium .......................... 5400 C .......................................... N
Platinum ............................................................................... S
Gold ............................ 425 C - 600C ................................. N
Mercury .............................................................................. Y

If you separate the gold, iridium and platinum out by dissolving the mix in HCl, then you can part the gold from this by heating the dry precipitate over 425 degrees. This would leave mostly iridium with a bit of platinum.
You can also take the dissolved m-state and re-precipitate it. The rhodium should be the first to come out of the dried precipitate when heated to 1066 degrees Celsius.
Hudson has a great deal more information on his chemical parting methods in his Australian patent.