biological transmutations - excerpts from human-resonance.org


http://www.human-resonance.org/qi.html

[]Russian scientists... installed three neutron detectors that were sensitive to low energy neutrons: one above ground, one partially shielded in a building, and a third underground... The cosmic rays generate muons that collide with something in or very near the detector, resulting in neutrons that have the high energy of the muon being registered. Neutrons from lightning, on the other hand, can only have the energy given up by a fission event, which is then lost in collisions with molecules in the air as they travel to the detector... In the previous experiments, it had been assumed that each detection event corresponded to a single neutron, [whereas] the new data show that up to 5,000 neutrons per cubic meter are produced every second by lightning strikes...+

[]Densely concentrated resonant nuclear transmutations of deuterium into protium remain the only viable explanation for the origin of neutron flux released by atmospheric HHO plasma briefly generated during lightning strikes.

[]Kervran defined resonant nuclear reactions as reversible, and involving both fusion and fission events between gases, metals, nonmetals and earths. His simple in vitro demonstration of the oxygen-dependent low energy atomic conversion of carbon into iron was reported in 1962, wherein ultrapure carbon rods were used as electrodes in an aqueous discharge system. Sediment analysis confirmed the fusion of two carbon atoms with two oxygen atoms in the formation of iron.

Multiple government-funded investigations into recurring cases of fatal carbon monoxide poisoning of steelworkers in France were finally concluded with Kervran's definitive 1964 demonstration under controlled laboratory conditions that lethal quantities of carbon monoxide are generated during steel plasma-cutting processes over 400°C by low energy nuclear transmutations of nitrogen gas. The fact that carbon monoxide is not formed below this critical temperature threshold is consistent with advanced atomic resonance calculations derived decades later, providing a basis for the determination of optimal temperature ranges for all such resonant atomic reactions that occur throughout natural systems.

[]airborne pairs of nitrogen atoms readily combine to form silicon at the edge of the thermosphere. A similar fusion event was identified in volcanic reactions where pairs of carbon atoms merge in the formation of magnesium, while pairs of oxygen atoms merge to form sulfur. The natural abundance of elements and the specific isotope ratios produced in thermospheric and volcanic processes provide compelling evidence for low energy nuclear reactions as the unified driving force of nature.

[]Various researchers have obtained significant evidence for biological transmutation as the origin of calcium from nuclear conversions of sodium, magnesium, potassium and silicon in a wide range of organisms that secrete calcium from one side of a membrane to produce protective shells. Experiments showed that avian and reptilian species deprived of dietary calcium were incapable of producing solid eggshells unless provided with a dietary source of silicon that was readily converted into the calcium required for normal eggshell development. Similar experiments with crustacean species deprived of environmental calcium sources revealed their ability to supplant calcium with magnesium to facilitate normal shell development.

Kervran also determined that calcium formation during tooth enamel and bone growth processes in all vertebrate species was mitigated by the same substitutive resonant nuclear reactions of magnesium and oxygen fusing to form calcium, as well as another notable reaction -carbon fusing with fluorine to form phosphorus. The reversal of the latter process was identified in the bacterial digestion of bone, with phosphorus undergoing resonant fission into carbon and fluorine daughter isotopes. The constant emission of fluorine gas during bone decomposition is relied upon in the dating of fossil specimens, yet its genesis as a fission product of bacterial digestion remains the only viable explanation.

Soil productivity is another area that Kervran's biological transmutation research has benefitted, after his unique findings concerning utilization of copper by wheat plants for resonant conversion into manganese. Initial attempts to increase manganese levels in wheat by the addition of manganese to soil proved fatal to test plants, while extensive trials by wheat farmers in Alberta, Canada confirmed Kervran's findings that supplementing soils with bluestone copper rebalances manganese and doubled soil productivity.

[]Kervran further applied his comprehensive findings to resolve many commonly misunderstood biomineral deficiencies in humans involving the biological transmutation of all essential elements as magnesium, calcium, manganese, iron, copper and zinc. In fact, it is known that calcium deficiency and resulting bone-depletion cannot be reversed by calcium intake. Calcium is now widely supplemented with magnesium, but the underlying mechanism can only be satisfactorily explained by resonant atomic transmutation. Hard evidence for fusion of magnesium and oxygen atoms is found in measurable Ca44 depletions in all bone.

An identical situation exists in dietary supplements manufactured for both iron and copper, which must be given together to achieve rebalancing of either essential element, as blood metabolism involves the resonant conversion of one element into the other. Comparative study of the three main varieties of animal blood --green, blue and red-- reveal distinct sets of nuclear reaction cascades taking place within narrow resonant temperature bands enabled by thermocline migration and thermoregulation strategies.

Cellular respiration processes in all green-blooded organisms, including ascidian, holothurian and sponge species, exhibit an alternate transmutation of iron that closely relates to those used by red- and blue-blooded species (vertebrates, cephalopods, gastropods and crustaceans). Fission of iron atoms forms titanium and vanadium in green blood while in red blood the fusion of iron and oxygen forms copper and in blue blood the fission of copper atoms forms oxygen, manganese and iron.

[]Kervran's elucidation of the electrically enhanced nuclear fusion of sodium and oxygen to form stable potassium occurs under the exact conditions that are constantly maintained in healthy blood, in conjunction with the fusion of iron and oxygen atoms, forming stable copper isotope Cu65.

[]The indispensible role of absorbed oxygen atoms in the resonant nuclear conversions of sodium into potassium and iron into copper directly implicates these specific reactions as primary mechanisms for blood's rebalancing of crucial metal concentrations, thus enabling effective utilization of a wider ratio of available metals to fulfill the well-known respiratory functions as well as the newly discovered biophotonic functions of blood medium.

[]Dimensional phonon resonance occurs when the space occupied by one isotope is exactly the same as that of another isotope in its rest state [i.e. 20°C]. This event can only occur under the following two conditions: the expansion of an isotope by heating, or the contraction of an isotope by cooling. Due to the natural characteristics of elemental properties, this event is extremely rare and one can only force the event under select conditions.

[]Phonon vibration of individual iron atoms enclosed within hemoglobin proteins display an oscillatory mode that corresponds to one of the four stable iron isotopes (Fe54, Fe56, Fe57, Fe58), allowing only four distinct possibilities for precision tuning of the resonant nuclear fusion of iron and oxygen atoms. Comprising only 2.2% of the abundance of iron, Fe57 is the only iron isotope that resonates at a frequency corresponding to the atomic diameter of the target isotope Cu65 near room temperature.

[]The resonant frequency of copper target isotope (Cu65) at the 20°C rest state is 43,622,792 Hz, according to its atomic diameter and thermal expansion coefficient. Iron starting isotope (Fe57) matches this atomic diameter while resonating at the target frequency of 43,622,792 Hz during precision heating to 37.5°C.

[]Blood circulating within the heart and large arteries maintains temperature near 38.0°C, slightly elevated above average core body temperature near 37.0°C. This significant variance of blood from the mean human body temperature induces rhythmic thermal fluctuations in blood cells according to their cyclical transport from the warm heart to the slightly cooler extremities and skin capillaries. During circulation, iron (Fe57) atoms split the mass of bound oxygen atoms to form helium and copper (Cu65) atoms at 37.5°C: Fe57 + O16 = 2He4 + Cu65.

Half the nuclear mass of oxygen atoms fuses with iron atoms to form copper, while the remaining eight nucleons are released as diatomic helium that rapidly escapes from red blood cells and blood plasma, for helium is insoluble in water at low pressure. As atmospheric helium is very rare and does not form any compounds that can be ingested, the presence of helium traces in human blood can only be accounted for as an exotic byproduct of phonon resonance reactions occurring within the heme groups of erythrocytes.

Recognition of this atomic reaction offers a new view of hemoglobin and myoglobin proteins as nuclear transmutation nanomachines, efficiently reducing iron nanoparticles into individual atoms for binding with oxygen molecules during transport, while electrical currents in the bloodstream dissociate iron-bound O2 molecules for recombination as diatomic helium and copper. By this mechanism, nuclear conversion rates are enhanced by natural exposure to electric current through barefoot contact with the Earth.

[]The four stable isotopes comprising chromium nanoparticles (Cr50, Cr52, Cr53, Cr54) are in constant oscillation at four distinct frequency modes of phonon resonance within the crystal lattice. The low energy nuclear fusion reaction of chromium and oxygen atoms to form nickel is optimized at the resonant frequency of nickel target isotope (Ni62) at rest state: 44,219,726 Hz. Chromium starting isotope (Cr50) resonates at this exact phonon frequency during precision heating to 37.9°C

The resonant reactions of iron into copper and chromium into nickel are also accompanied by the resonant fission reaction of manganese into chromium and vanadium, which takes place under exactly the same conditions present in the human bloodstream, according to frequency matching by Mn55 and Cr53.

The low energy fission of manganese to form hydrogen, chromium and vanadium is optimized at the resonant frequency of chromium target isotope (Cr53) at rest state: 43,378,479 Hz. Manganese starting isotope (Mn55) resonates at this exact phonon frequency during precision heating to 37.5°C

[]Nuclear transmutations of metals were identified in multiple budding yeast species (Champion, 2008) and disclosed in US Patent Application US2008/0081359: 'Methods for Producing Mutant Microbes Useful for Precious Metal and Bioenergy Production'. Intriguing metabolic processes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae convert silver surfaces into gold, platinum and palladium (below) within a narrow resonant temperature band at 43.4°C ±1°C by employing electrokinesis in conjunction with carbon-dioxide (CO2) production during fermentation while binding to silver surfaces using the SSB-1 protein. This set of aqueous conditions is also observed of blood -electronic excitation with specific elevated temperature and specific gas pressure.

In various basic microbial experiments, resonant nuclear mass recombinations have been identified in which specific gases are absorbed by metals and subsequently undergo an induced nuclear fusion event, whereby metal and gas atoms merge to form heavier metallic isotopes.

[]Low energy nuclear transmutation of silver into gold, platinum and palladium can be induced without using any biological agents, by precision control of atomic resonance and pressure in a two-stage reaction developed and refined by this author in 2011.

The first stage of the transmutation reaction involves precision heating to maintain the starting element (silver) at the phonon resonance frequency of the target element (gold), during a 24-hour dwell time under gas pressure. The resonant temperature calculation for the conversion of silver into gold is determined by application of the phonon resonance formula using recently obtained atomic data for greatest accuracy, as even small discrepancies in atomic data significantly influence the precision of calculation.

The resonant frequency of gold (Au197) in its rest state is 38,945,222 Hz, according to the element's atomic diameter at 20°C. Heavy silver isotope (Ag109) cannot be heated to resonate at the desired target frequency, yet becomes informed by the frequency vibrations of the adjacent atoms of the sister isotope. Silver isotope (Ag107) resonates at the (Au197) target frequency of 38,945,222 Hz when heated to 43.4°C

Once the starting element is instilled with the atomic frequency signature of the target element, the second stage of the transmutation reaction involves the quantum trapping and restabilization procedure that triggers bulk conversion of the starting element into the target element - according to the established atomic frequency 'memory'. While a notable weight increase can be measured immediately after the quantum trapping procedure is completed (and shows no variation thereafter), the stunning visible color changes take place very gradually over the course of the following 100 hours!

[]The conversion of iron into copper employed by red-blooded animals is utilized in reverse as a fission reaction by blue-blooded marine animals (the cephalopods, gastropods and crustaceans) and a great variety of terrestrial and aquatic plant species (Kervran, 1964). Copper (Cu63) atoms release helium atom pairs to form manganese (Mn55) atoms, while copper (Cu65) atoms release helium atom pairs to form iron (Fe57) atoms, according to the conversion formulae: Cu63 = 2He4 + Mn55 ; Cu65 - 2He4 + Fe57

Resonant conversions of dietary copper into iron and manganese are employed by vast multitudes of lifeforms that do not regulate their own body temperatures, because the narrow temperature band required for such conversions lies very close to the mean ambient temperature in a great variety of habitats. However, careful calculation of phonon relationships reveal that frequency resonance of copper with iron and manganese cannot occur anywhere near ambient ocean temperatures.

These copper fission reactions constantly occurring in blue blood produce oxygen in the presence of hydrogen by phonon frequency matching of deuterium at 23.5°C with helium atoms at rest (20°C). The most common heavy isotope of hydrogen, deuterium is present in the rivers, lakes, seas and oceans at trace levels near 0.0156%. Aquatic organisms of all kinds inhabiting the ocean's pelagic zones exploit helium-producing phonon resonance reaction cascades by following a rising and falling band of seawater near 23.5°C, while light hydrogen cooled to 13.8°C resonates with oxygen at rest.

Despite significant differences in atomic mass and density between the two elements, hydrogen and oxygen atoms actually present similar atomic diameters, thereby allowing phonon resonance to occur very close to the rest state. This intriguing fact allows the phonon vibrations of hydrogen atoms absorbed into metal nanoparticles to instill metal atoms with the resonant target frequency of oxygen.

Resonant nuclear fission of pairs of copper atoms to form oxygen, manganese and iron occurs at the resonant frequency of target isotope (O16) in its rest state --at 3,775,138 Hz. Copper starting isotopes (Cu63, Cu65) become instilled with the phonon frequency of oxygen target isotope (O16) by the vibrations of absorbed hydrogen (H1) atoms within the metal lattice, during precision cooling to 13.8°C.

Similar fission reactions can be induced in iron atoms at the same resonant 13.8°C temperature, whereby terrestrial and aquatic plants are able to convert iron into calcium, as also exploited by cold-blooded animals in the growth of bone, carapace, protective shell or eggshell: Fe56 = O16 + Ca40 ; Fe57 = O16 + Ca41 ; Fe58 = O16 + Ca42 .

The cascade of oxygen-producing reactions at 13.8°C proceeds with an additional step following the same isotopic conversion pattern, involving transmutation of calcium into oxygen and magnesium: Ca40 = O16 + Mg24 ; Ca41 = O16 + Mg25 ; Ca42 = O16 + Mg26

The most unusual atomic conversions taking place in the animal kingdom have raised eyebrows among biophysicists for years, who have been unable to satisfactorily account for the exceedingly high concentrations of exotic metals in the bodies of sea squirts, and virtually all ascidian species. Titanium is the exotic byproduct of resonant conversions of copper into oxygen in green-blooded species that can also be induced at the calculated phonon frequency resonance threshold of 13.8°C: Cu63 = O16 + Ti47 ; Cu65 = O16 + Ti49

Just as blue-blooded animals utilize copper, green-blooded animals also rely on the close phonon frequency matching of hydrogen and oxygen atoms to induce resonant nuclear conversions of iron. Trace metal analyses of the green blood of tunicates reveal high concentrations of rare metals within tunichrome blood pigments that comprise solid evidence of low energy nuclear transmutations.

The blood of Pyura chilensis contains high levels of iron and titanium while Ascidia dispar presents high levels of iron, titanium and vanadium (Roman et al., 1988). The predominant nuclear reactions releasing biophoton cascades in green blood involve the fission of iron atoms during precision heating to 23.5°C, producing helium, titanium and vanadium atoms: Fe54 = 2He4 + Ti46 ; Fe56 = 2He4 + Ti48 ; Fe57 = 2He4 + Ti49 ; Fe58 = 2He4 + Ti50 ; Fe58 = 2He4 + V50

The four stable isotopes of iron can only be converted into four of the five stable isotopes of titanium, indicating isotopic shifts may be expressed in Ti47 depletion. In the case of human blood, perpetual Cu65 enhancement provides definitive confirmation of ongoing resonant conversions of iron into copper. Further studies of tunicate metabolism may establish if ascidians, when deprived of an environmental source of titanium and vanadium, are capable of transmuting those elements from copper and iron.

[]The green biochrome pigment chlorophyll binds magnesium and oxygen atoms, implicating a resonant atomic fusion reaction forming sulfur and phosphorus and releasing soft multi-photon radiation in the visible light range. []Magnesium atoms split oxygen to form helium, hydrogen and sulfur atoms. Resonant fusion reactions occurring in green chlorophyll molecules produce hydrogen, helium, sulfur and unstable sulfur (S31) atoms, with a half-life of 2.572 seconds, undergoing positron emission during ß+ decay to form stable phosphorus (P31) atoms.

Phonon resonance determinations confirm this reaction occurs by frequency matching in the heat of daylight. Low energy fusion of magnesium atom pairs with oxygen atoms to form sulfur pairs occurs at the resonant frequency of unstable target isotope (S31) in its rest state -at 34,250,831 Hz. Magnesium starting isotope (Mg26) resonates at this exact phonon frequency during precision heating to 28.1°C.

Green terrestrial and aquatic plants, algae and phytoplankton species that produce chlorophyll for photosynthesis are able to optimize the fusion of magnesium and oxygen atoms in direct sunlight, which brings the sunlit surfaces of leaves and the oceans to the required resonance at 28.1°C.

[]The expansive Southern Ocean is also populated by warm-blooded mammals that developed a slightly different strategy to withstand the harsh sub-zero temperatures experienced in the depths of winter. Insulation provided by a thick fat layer maintains red blood circulation between 35 - 39°C within the bodies of whales and seals, whereby resonant atomic transmutation of iron into copper is enabled by phonon frequency matching of Fe57 atoms at 37.5°C with Cu65 atoms at rest. This resonant fusion reaction of iron and oxygen atoms that occurs in the hemoglobin of red-blooded mammals, and at a lower rate in the red-blooded fishes, cannot take place in icewater. Instead, a fission reaction has been effectively exploited by the near-freezing glass blood of the icefishes, which circulates much more slowly than the red blood of fish, sharks, seals and whales. Transparent blood and icefish tissue display levels of manganese that are a few hundred times greater than those of tropical fish, resulting from sustained nuclear transmutations of iron into hydrogen and manganese.

Such high concentrations of manganese in icefish cannot be explained as bioaccumulation products, but instead comprise solid evidence for perpetual resonant atomic reaction cascades releasing biophotons that are part of the essential vital processes enabling life within such harsh temperature extremes. Fission of iron atoms to form hydrogen and manganese atoms occurs at the resonant frequency of manganese target isotope (Mn55) at rest state: 43,416,442 Hz. Iron starting isotope (Fe58) resonates at this exact phonon frequency during precision cooling to 0.0°C

As shown, icefish metabolism can only occur at the freezing point of water. This Fe into H, Mn fission reaction was previously suggested after laboratory investigations of manganobacterial residues deposited on weathered ferruginous rocks, as well as prehistoric cave paintings made with iron-rich red ochre pigments (Kervran, 1964).

[]While land-based plant life thrives in specific habitat regions where crucial temperature resonance requirements are met, aquatic organisms undertake mass nocturnal migrations toward warmer surface waters to sustain the sensitive nuclear reaction cascades generating light within their bodies. The nightly rise of plankton and invertebrates up the water column thermocline has been explained as a feeding strategy to graze richer pelagic waters under protection of darkness, yet must be further understood as optimizing temperature-dependent phonon resonance reactions crucial to life.

The conversion of iron into copper employed by red-blooded animals is utilized in reverse as a fission reaction by blue-blooded marine animals (the cephalopods, gastropods and crustaceans) and a great variety of terrestrial and aquatic plant species (Kervran, 1964). Copper (Cu63) atoms release helium atom pairs to form manganese (Mn55) atoms, while copper (Cu65) atoms release helium atom pairs to form iron (Fe57) atoms

[]Resonant conversions of dietary copper into iron and manganese are employed by vast multitudes of lifeforms that do not regulate their own body temperatures, because the narrow temperature band required for such conversions lies very close to the mean ambient temperature in a great variety of habitats. However, careful calculation of phonon relationships reveal that frequency resonance of copper with iron and manganese cannot occur anywhere near ambient ocean temperatures.

These copper fission reactions constantly occurring in blue blood produce oxygen in the presence of hydrogen by phonon frequency matching of deuterium at 23.5°C with helium atoms at rest (20°C). The most common heavy isotope of hydrogen, deuterium is present in the rivers, lakes, seas and oceans at trace levels near 0.0156%. Aquatic organisms of all kinds inhabiting the ocean's pelagic zones exploit helium-producing phonon resonance reaction cascades by following a rising and falling band of seawater near 23.5°C, while light hydrogen cooled to 13.8°C resonates with oxygen at rest.

Despite significant differences in atomic mass and density between the two elements, hydrogen and oxygen atoms actually present similar atomic diameters, thereby allowing phonon resonance to occur very close to the rest state. This intriguing fact allows the phonon vibrations of hydrogen atoms absorbed into metal nanoparticles to instill metal atoms with the resonant target frequency of oxygen.

Resonant nuclear fission of pairs of copper atoms to form oxygen, manganese and iron occurs at the resonant frequency of target isotope (O16) in its rest state --at 3,775,138 Hz. Copper starting isotopes (Cu63, Cu65) become instilled with the phonon frequency of oxygen target isotope (O16) by the vibrations of absorbed hydrogen (H1) atoms within the metal lattice, during precision cooling to 13.8°C

Similar fission reactions can be induced in iron atoms at the same resonant 13.8°C temperature, whereby terrestrial and aquatic plants are able to convert iron into calcium, as also exploited by cold-blooded animals in the growth of bone, carapace, protective shell or eggshell

The cascade of oxygen-producing reactions at 13.8°C proceeds with an additional step following the same isotopic conversion pattern, involving transmutation of calcium into oxygen and magnesium

The most unusual atomic conversions taking place in the animal kingdom have raised eyebrows among biophysicists for years, who have been unable to satisfactorily account for the exceedingly high concentrations of exotic metals in the bodies of sea squirts, and virtually all ascidian species. Titanium is the exotic byproduct of resonant conversions of copper into oxygen in green-blooded species that can also be induced at the calculated phonon frequency resonance threshold of 13.8°C

Just as blue-blooded animals utilize copper, green-blooded animals also rely on the close phonon frequency matching of hydrogen and oxygen atoms to induce resonant nuclear conversions of iron. Trace metal analyses of the green blood of tunicates reveal high concentrations of rare metals within tunichrome blood pigments that comprise solid evidence of low energy nuclear transmutations.

The blood of Pyura chilensis contains high levels of iron and titanium while Ascidia dispar presents high levels of iron, titanium and vanadium (Roman et al., 1988). The predominant nuclear reactions releasing biophoton cascades in green blood involve the fission of iron atoms during precision heating to 23.5°C, producing helium, titanium and vanadium atoms

The four stable isotopes of iron can only be converted into four of the five stable isotopes of titanium, indicating isotopic shifts may be expressed in Ti47 depletion. In the case of human blood, perpetual Cu65 enhancement provides definitive confirmation of ongoing resonant conversions of iron into copper. Further studies of tunicate metabolism may establish if ascidians, when deprived of an environmental source of titanium and vanadium, are capable of transmuting those elements from copper and iron.

[]During heat stress, as skin passes 49°C, sweat gland secretions transmute sodium into potassium.

When inhaled, nitrogen heated >413°C converts into carbon monoxide on contact with lung tissue.

[]Preliminary research by C.L. Kervran provided the first coherent evidence for this counter-intuitive biological mechanism being the result of low energy nuclear transmutations taking place within the body itself, suggesting that supplementing levels of other crucial elements may achieve rebalancing of bone calcium during depletion. To this end, simple dietary trials were conducted that revealed horsetail tea effectively increases calcium levels in the body by supplying silicon for conversion into calcium.

[]Digitally-controlled phonon resonance reactors now enable replication of low energy nuclear reactions perpetually taking place during bone formation. Red blood cells supply the starting element used by the body to accomplish low energy transmutation of potassium into calcium that accounts for the significant isotopic variation of mineralized bone calcium from dietary calcium and tissues.

During blood circulation through the fine network of Haversian canals that course through compact bone, potassium atoms within erythrocytes maintain rhythmic temperature fluctuations between 37-38°C that trigger the resonant conversion reaction. Each oxygen-bound atom of potassium isotope (K41) releases a single hydrogen atom during the formation of stable atoms of calcium isotope (Ca40): K19/41 + O8/16 = H1/1 + Ca20/40 + O8/16

This reaction occurs simultaneously with closely related atomic conversion cascades that also include Zn => Cu, Cu => Ni, Ni => Co, Fe => Mn, Mn => Cr and Cr => V. This extensive series of reactions is facilitated within red blood cells by phonon frequency matching at the median temperature that is closely maintained within the core of the body, where the heart is located. The bones of the body are also well insulated from heat loss by muscle, fat and skin layers, comprising the core of each extremity.

Transmutation of potassium into calcium in vertebrate bone is enabled by phonon frequency matching of potassium-bound oxygen atoms with hydrogen atoms at rest state. The resonant frequency of hydrogen isotope (H1) in its rest state is 3,773,180 Hz, according to the element's atomic diameter at 20°C. Oxygen isotope (O16) resonates at this same frequency when heated to 37.8°C

These phonon resonance determinations suggest that potassium deficiency, in particular, negatively influences the body's ability to rebalance calcium production levels, leading to gradual bone mineral loss. A balanced diet including potassium-rich foods is therefore recommended, especially white beans, dark leafy greens, baked potatoes and acorn squash, avocados, dried apricots, mushrooms and bananas, as well as herbal beverages such as horsetail tea.